Great Thurlow Hall, wet, wet, wet.(6/18).

Last Sunday was yet another wet, wet, wet day. Unable to work in my own garden and combined with Easter excess I decided that the only thing was to visit another garden. As I approached Great Thurlow Hall in Suffolk through a deluge of rain, signs of Spring were just visible on those manicured hedges … Continue reading Great Thurlow Hall, wet, wet, wet.(6/18).

5 Burbage Road, Herne Hill; a tiny touch of Spring.

Following the book launch of the National Garden Scheme's Gardens to Visit at the Royal Festival Hall last Thursday I decided to walk along the Thames, jump on a train at London Bridge and travel to North Dulwich. As I walked the 5 minutes down Half Moon Lane the sun came out and there was a feeling … Continue reading 5 Burbage Road, Herne Hill; a tiny touch of Spring.

Austwick Hall; sculpture and snowdrops

Staying on a short break near Settle in Yorkshire last week we found Austwick Hall perched above a pretty Dales village not far from the market town of Settle.  Set in 13 acres the garden and woodland had just had its open day for the NGS during the snowdrop Festival. Close by the house the … Continue reading Austwick Hall; sculpture and snowdrops

Houghton Hall Walled Garden; all wrapped up and waiting. (3/18)

  Last month Norfolk NGS was privileged to be invited by the Marquess of Cholmondeley to launch the 2018 booklet in the Stable Cafe at Houghton Hall. Nationally the NGS is the single biggest donor to Marie Curie and over delicious plates of sausage rolls and cake we listened to eloquent speakers from the charity … Continue reading Houghton Hall Walled Garden; all wrapped up and waiting. (3/18)

Garden visiting from the armchair; a trio of books, blogs, and Instagram. (2/18)

During these past few weeks I have been rather housebound. So, content with a log fire and the fragrant sprigs of evergreen Sarcococca confusa Sweet Box cut from the border, I have been visiting gardens from the comfort of my armchair. I was kindly given The Secret Gardens of East Anglia before Christmas in gratitude of completing my Ninety gardens.  … Continue reading Garden visiting from the armchair; a trio of books, blogs, and Instagram. (2/18)

Repton and his business

It is the bicentenary of the death of Humphry Repton, he of the Red Book fame. There are many events organised and gardens gates opening throughout the year. This piece was so interesting that I am reblogging.

Parks and Gardens UK

HAPPY NEW YEAR!  If you hadn’t already realised 2018 is Repton Year, when we’re commemorating the life and work of the last great landscape designer of the eighteenth century.  Unlike the Festival for his ‘predecessor’ Capability Brown there is no great central nationally funded organization. Instead Celebrating Humphry Repton  will be a collaborative effort, which, even though although it can’t match the funding of CB300,  looks certain to match the enthusiasm and spread of interest nationally.  County Gardens Trusts and other groups will be arranging events around the country throughout the year to celebrate Repton’s work. You can find a list – continually being updated – at this dedicated webpage on  The Gardens Trust website.  If you would like to get involved or receive updates email repton@thegardenstrust.org. The more people who join in, the better the celebration!

And of course the blog is going to play its small part.  Repton has…

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Pembroke College, a peaceful and pretty peramble. (1/18)

It is just over a year ago now that I began to blog about my garden visits. The first was Robinson College, Cambridge and I remember being surprised it was open on 2nd January. It is still very much open for the NGS and I thoroughly recommend a visit:  Robinson College However finding myself back in … Continue reading Pembroke College, a peaceful and pretty peramble. (1/18)

T’was the week before Christmas. (*****)

T'was the week before Christmas I’d finished the year Ninety great gardens so far and so near The stockings were hung on the gateposts with care In the hope that the NGS raised such good fare All gardeners now were so snug in their beds With visions of plum trees that danced in their heads … Continue reading T’was the week before Christmas. (*****)

Stoke Mandeville, Horatio’s Garden. (90)

For The Ninetieth garden I was invited to see a very special garden at Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire. The day of the visit, last Monday the sky was a dull grey and there had been heavy snow the previous day. The Hospital is famous for its National Spinal Injuries Centre, one of the largest specialist … Continue reading Stoke Mandeville, Horatio’s Garden. (90)

The Manor House, Bledlow; sculpture and setting (89)

Back in May we stayed with friends in North Buckinghamshire and they suggested we might visit Bledlow Manor, the home of Lord Carrington. A beautiful drive through the Chilterns brought us to this lovely estate and we were able to park under the line of flowering chestnut trees. The house had been in the family … Continue reading The Manor House, Bledlow; sculpture and setting (89)