Madingley Hall, gardens and health. (8/18)

Having spent a tedious morning on the phone to the Department of Work & Pensions, followed by a lengthy call to BT to try and sort out longstanding internet problems, I decided it was time to visit a garden and restore my equilibrium. Twitter brought my attention to the fact that Madingley Hall was opening its … Continue reading Madingley Hall, gardens and health. (8/18)

Bank House, well planted in the Fens (7/18)

The area  between Downham Market and Wisbech on the edge of Norfolk is not particularly known for its gardens. Last Sunday driving through the lanes and over the dykes between the flat fertile fields of the Fens, I discovered Bank House. The familiar yellow NGS signs were helpfully posted at all the crossroads which relieved … Continue reading Bank House, well planted in the Fens (7/18)

Great Thurlow Hall, wet, wet, wet.(6/18).

Last Sunday was yet another wet, wet, wet day. Unable to work in my own garden and combined with Easter excess I decided that the only thing was to visit another garden. As I approached Great Thurlow Hall in Suffolk through a deluge of rain, signs of Spring were just visible on those manicured hedges … Continue reading Great Thurlow Hall, wet, wet, wet.(6/18).

5 Burbage Road, Herne Hill; a tiny touch of Spring.

Following the book launch of the National Garden Scheme's Gardens to Visit at the Royal Festival Hall last Thursday I decided to walk along the Thames, jump on a train at London Bridge and travel to North Dulwich. As I walked the 5 minutes down Half Moon Lane the sun came out and there was a feeling … Continue reading 5 Burbage Road, Herne Hill; a tiny touch of Spring.

Garden visiting from the armchair; a trio of books, blogs, and Instagram. (2/18)

During these past few weeks I have been rather housebound. So, content with a log fire and the fragrant sprigs of evergreen Sarcococca confusa Sweet Box cut from the border, I have been visiting gardens from the comfort of my armchair. I was kindly given The Secret Gardens of East Anglia before Christmas in gratitude of completing my Ninety gardens.  … Continue reading Garden visiting from the armchair; a trio of books, blogs, and Instagram. (2/18)

Repton and his business

It is the bicentenary of the death of Humphry Repton, he of the Red Book fame. There are many events organised and gardens gates opening throughout the year. This piece was so interesting that I am reblogging.

The Gardens Trust

HAPPY NEW YEAR!  If you hadn’t already realised 2018 is Repton Year, when we’re commemorating the life and work of the last great landscape designer of the eighteenth century.  Unlike the Festival for his ‘predecessor’ Capability Brown there is no great central nationally funded organization. Instead Celebrating Humphry Repton  will be a collaborative effort, which, even though although it can’t match the funding of CB300,  looks certain to match the enthusiasm and spread of interest nationally.  County Gardens Trusts and other groups will be arranging events around the country throughout the year to celebrate Repton’s work. You can find a list – continually being updated – at this dedicated webpage on  The Gardens Trust website.  If you would like to get involved or receive updates email repton@thegardenstrust.org. The more people who join in, the better the celebration!

And of course the blog is going to play its small part.  Repton has…

View original post 2,044 more words

Pembroke College, a peaceful and pretty peramble. (1/18)

It is just over a year ago now that I began to blog about my garden visits. The first was Robinson College, Cambridge and I remember being surprised it was open on 2nd January. It is still very much open for the NGS and I thoroughly recommend a visit:  Robinson College However finding myself back in … Continue reading Pembroke College, a peaceful and pretty peramble. (1/18)

T’was the week before Christmas. (*****)

T'was the week before Christmas I’d finished the year Ninety great gardens so far and so near The stockings were hung on the gateposts with care In the hope that the NGS raised such good fare All gardeners now were so snug in their beds With visions of plum trees that danced in their heads … Continue reading T’was the week before Christmas. (*****)

42 Falconer Road, all a twinkle in Bushey. (88)

When I began my Ninety Garden Adventure back in January, I did not imagine that there would still be gardens opening in November. The entry in Gardens to View appeared encouraging if not a little intriguing especially with the opening time advertised as 4pm. I could not resist a visit on my circuitous route to London. The … Continue reading 42 Falconer Road, all a twinkle in Bushey. (88)

Lakeside House, a welcome and watery restoration. (87)

The calendar of garden visiting is on pause now, and with the skiing season fast approaching one of the gardens I look back at with fondness, is the extraordinary garden at Brundall, once known as 'The Switzerland of Norfolk'. The garden was created in 1880 by a Dr Beverley who, along with planting an arboretum, … Continue reading Lakeside House, a welcome and watery restoration. (87)