Grendon Court. (48)

A combined opening with Brockhampton Cottage (47) and just a few miles away is Grendon Court near Ross-on-Wye, another garden designed by Tom Stuart-Smith. We drive right up through the old farmyard to park the car in the field on the other side of the house and so enter the garden

DSCF2057.jpg

through the tall hedges at the bottom of the garden.

DSCF2055.jpg

Here we find Otis the terrier busy digging in the wacky box parterre,

DSCF1974.jpg

with its wonderful wavy form.

DSCF1973.jpg

The garden is on two levels rising up a steep bank

DSCF1976.jpg

we take the steps up and pass through the opening in the hedge.

DSCF1979.jpg

where a mown path

DSCF1981.jpg

leads us through the miscanthus grass

DSCF2017.jpg

to the hidden swimming pool up above the house.

DSCF1998 (1).jpg

It is a warm windy day and we head straight to the teas, passing a wall seemingly decorated with different shades of centranthus ruber.

DSCF1988.jpg

The doors to the magnificent barn stand wide open for teas.

DSCF1992.jpg

Inside it is spacious and a cool white. Peonies grown in the garden fill the vases on the table. The garden owner is doing sterling work on her own. The choice of cake is simple, it is a good idea, saving the buyer many moments of indecision.

DSCF1991

We are revived by the delicious slice of coffee and walnut cake and two mugs of tea, and return through the door in the wall into the upper garden.

DSCF1993.jpg

The pool looks so inviting,

DSCF1984.jpg

 

with the blocks of miscanthus grass rustling in the wind.

DSCF1994.jpg

It is not just a pool area; in this walled part of the garden, there is a mixture of planting divided by narrow paths.

DSCF2007.jpg

The peony beds are here and we admire in particular this beauty ‘White Wings’.

DSCF2004.jpg

You can understand why the tulip tree, Liriodendron tulipfera, is not for a small garden. A member of the magnolia family it is the largest American hardwood, reaching up to 200ft in eastern USA. First known in this country in around 1688 when it was being grown by Bishop Compton at Fulham Palace in London.

DSCF2015.jpg

Looking more like lilies than tulips the tree does not produce flowers for many years; I am still waiting for mine and am envious of this one which has many buds and flowers.

There is a gentle hue of pinks and purples from geranium and veronicastrum.

DSCF2013 (1).jpg

Retracing our steps through the hedge,

DSCF2024.jpg

We pause a moment to view the fine mown lawn, the waves of box and the agricultural land beyond.

DSCF2023.jpg

Before admiring the fine array of stone pots that are planted simply and effectively.

A variety of climbers grow against the house and this pretty blue clematis is putting on quite a show.

DSCF2028.jpg

There is a small garden to the east side of the house where a neat mulberry grows on the lawn.

DSCF2041.jpg

Back to the front again the path runs through Alchemilla mollisaliums, veronicastrum and phlomis with yew cones standing upright along the low wall.

DSCF2031.jpg

It is a quite a drop from the wall and through the rose we can enjoy the sweeping undulation of the green fields below.

DSCF2034.jpg

It has been a record number of visitors this afternoon. A gentle face has enjoyed the trickle of nearly  hundred.

DSCF2033.jpg

——-47——-

8 thoughts on “Grendon Court. (48)

  1. Yet more wonderful photos and descriptions, I particularly liked the tulip tree and the one taken through the hedge of the agricultural land beyond

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Another wonderful place. I have no claims to be green-fingered but I did own a tulip tree in the Loire valley and it flowered happily every year… without or rather despite my attention. Maybe gentler climes?

    Like

  3. My goodness – what a challenge you have set yourself! Just the sort of challenge I might have set myself if I hadn’t got my own opening to work towards! I guess you have your itinerary all planned out and you will see such a range of gardens…how exciting!

    Like

  4. Oh wow! That tulip tree…I would love to see one. I never have.
    I also visit gardens as part of a series on my blog called MyGloriousGardens. I host a Linky party and would love if you could join up. Other garden bloggers link up and share ideas. I then put all posts on to my social media sites for more exposure.
    The next one is in early July.
    Good luck! X

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s